alignment

How to have happy wrists -and shoulders - in yoga

How to have happy wrists -and shoulders - in yoga

Ever get sore wrists in downward facing dog or plank pose?

Or simply feel like your arm muscles aren't strong enough to hold your weight? 

Your arm bones can help you with that. 

There are some simple trajectories of weight that will help you position your bones so they can do their share of the lifting better.

Why should I stand with my feet hip distance apart?

Why should I stand with my feet hip distance apart?

If you can line up your legs to be vertical - in your plumb line, stacking your bones to balance and bear weight you will be using your body in the most efficient way, rather than having any particular group of muscles working too hard. It's much easier to do this with your feet under your hips because of how gravity pulls on your body. Here's a quick lesson to explain exactly why and how! 

Your feet don't have four corners!

Your feet don't have four corners!

One of the most frustrating instructions I hear in yoga classes is to 'ground through all four corners of your feet'. But look down: not a corner in sight. Understanding how the pathway of weight travels through your feet will help you correct how you stand, walk, do yoga, run, play netball. 

What does it matter if I turn my feet in or out?

What does it matter if I turn my feet in or out?

There are all sorts of instructions in yoga about what we 'should' be doing with our feet, how far apart they should be, how they should be oriented.

We are interested in optimum biomechanics so we teach outside edges of your feet (the line between baby toe and heel) parallel. People often ask why this is better. 

I mean, most of us have been standing and walking with our feet turned out all our lives and we are fine, right?

Well, yes. More or less. Except for that nagging knee pain, those bunions, that ache in your hip, those shortened iliotibial bands, that lateral hip weakness...

Yoga for Comfort

Yoga for Comfort

The practice should suit the individual. 

For some of us challenging is great, and for some of us a quieter practice is better. In some parts of our lives, or when we are going through certain life experiences, those needs change again. In fact, our needs - and therefore the appropriate practice for us - change daily.