Your shoulders could be causing wrist pain.

Here I present you a picture of some muscles we don't use much for their intended purpose.

Scapular depressors.

We underuse them because most of us wear our shoulderblades (scapulae) high up on our backs, which is not anatomical neutral.

Depressors of the scapula. A, anterior: 1, lower segment of the pectoralis major; 2, pectoralis minor; 3, subclavius. B, posterior: 1, latissimus dorsi; 2, lower segment of the trapezius. Image courtesy of the Digital Resource Foundation

Depressors of the scapula. A, anterior: 1, lower segment of the pectoralis major; 2, pectoralis minor; 3, subclavius. B, posterior: 1, latissimus dorsi; 2, lower segment of the trapezius. Image courtesy of the Digital Resource Foundation

Neutral is more of a ‘down and in’ situation.

(Full explanation of how shoulderblades move can be found here)

If you habitually have your scapulae in any given position, it starts to feel like that is neutral, so you lose the ability to tell where your shoulders really are in space. 

Which means, when doing yoga and bearing weight through your hands and arms, you will tend to line your hands up under where you THINK your shoulderblades are. So, instead of your body being able to direct gravity through the centre of your joints and via the two bony bits on either side or your carpal tunnel (which should be arched), you direct force into the carpal tunnel.

that is a cause of wrist pain.

This is how we optimally deal with bearing weight in our arms (the gap between the yellow dots is the carpal tunnel):

Which would need the arm position on the left. 

(Skelina is working on her fists because she says her wrists hurt. They probably hurt because the position on the right is her habitual arm position and it's a pain-causing one)

Your first task here

Is to figure out where your shoulderblades are in space, which sometimes requires someone else showing you - but some patience and a mirror will work too. Do the all fours position like Skelina and watch where you naturally want to put your arms. You want to line them up so you get a straighter line through the centre of the joints rather than a sloping line.

Your second task

Is to practice holding your scapulae in neutral (you might need to do chest stretches to GET to neutral) and then you need to strengthen scapular depressors to hold neutral.

This is a favourite exercise because it both stretches my tight chest muscles AND trains scapular neutral:

Start by resting the curves of your head, upper back and pelvis against the wall, feet a little away from the wall, elbows being and tucked in to your waist.

 

Keeping those curves, exhale to turn your upper arm bones out to the side.

 

Go only as far as you can before you want to pop your head or ribs or some other body part forward off the wall.

 

Inhale to the start position, exhale repeat. 

 

Happy exploring!